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Hannover Messe 2022 Is On, With Focus on “biggest Transformation Since Industrialization”

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“We are facing the greatest transformation since industrialization — into resource-saving, climate-neutral and sustainable production,” said Dr. Jochen Köckler, CEO of Deutsche Messe AG. “Digitalization, automation, innovative technologies, and regenerative energy: These existing trends are the dynamic drivers for achieving climate goals. All fields of technology must work together and initiate constructive communication between business, politics, science, and society. With its global and thematic focus, Hannover Messe 2022 provides the ideal platform for this and once again enables face-to-face contact.”

Under the lead theme “Industrial Transformation,” leading global companies from the electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, logistics, energy, and IT and software sectors show how to shift successfully to digitalized, resource-efficient and climate-neutral production. By demonstrating concrete solutions, leading figures from science and business show how to master such a historic feat of strength.

For example, companies from the energy industry show how to produce green hydrogen efficiently as well as its potential for energy-intensive industrial companies. Climate-neutral mobility is another focal point.

Industrial companies provide technologies that reduce CO2 and show how energy efficiency can contribute to climate neutrality. Digitalization and automation enable networked manufacturing systems that operate more efficiently and conserve resources. Innovative technologies such as 3D printing create tailor-made components, which in return reduces inventories and resource usage.

Global supply chains were very vulnerable during the Covid pandemic, so relocalizing parts of the value chain would help reduce such vulnerability while also cutting back on CO2 emissions. Energy is also a crucial issue for logistics companies, especially since electrified products make up an ever-larger share in the forklift segment and increasingly displace combustion engines.

Digitalization includes topics such as networking, data analytics, Internet of Things, platforms, artificial intelligence, and cyber security. To survive against global competition, companies have to use digitalization to develop, manufacture and sell products faster and more efficiently. In Hannover, companies from electrical engineering, mechanical and plant engineering as well as IT and software show how to automate and digitalize entire process chains for climate-neutral production.

Hannover Messe 2022 emphasizes on-site participation. On the heels of the pandemic, exhibitors and visitors want to meet face-to-face, experience products and solutions in person, and network with the industrial community. Comprehensive digital presentation options extend the offer.

“Hannover Messe brings together the best of both worlds, enhancing the unique physical offering with innovative digital participation options. This makes Hannover Messe even more valuable for participating exhibitors from all over the world, because they generate additional leads in the digital space,” said Köckler.

Portugal is Partner Country at Hannover Messe 2022. Under the motto “Portugal Makes Sense,” Portugal presents itself at the exhibition as well as in forums and seminars. The focus is on industrial supply, digital platforms and energy solutions — areas that offer many synergies between Portugal and Germany and generate potential for new partnerships.

The next edition runs from April 25 to 29, 2022 in Hannover, Germany.

The post Hannover Messe 2022 is on, with focus on “biggest transformation since industrialization” appeared first on Design World.

Article: designworldonline.com

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Metaverse: What It Is, Facebook Name Change, and Everything Else Explained

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What exactly is metaverse, and why did Facebook decide to change its name to Meta? Everything you need to know.

Original Post: gadgets.ndtv.com

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This Is the World’s Oldest Image of a Ghost

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(credit: Photograph: The British Museum)

A curator exploring the shadowy recesses of the British Museum’s archives recently encountered a ghost—or rather, the world’s oldest image of one, etched onto a 3,500-year-old Babylonian clay tablet. The figure of a tall, emaciated spirit with his hands bound illustrates the text of an ancient exorcism ritual meant to banish the sort of ghost that “seizes hold of a person and pursues him and cannot be loosed.”

Irving Finkel, the curator of the British Museum’s Middle Eastern department and a specialist in cuneiform, the angular writing system of the ancient Babylonian civilization, recently translated the text of the ritual, which had remained unread and ignored since the British Museum acquired the tablet in the 1800s. At that time, museums across Europe were in a rush to stockpile Babylonian artifacts, and curators would often pay local people to loot clay and stone tablets, along with other artifacts, from archaeological sites in what is now Iraq. Most of those items arrived with little or no information about their context and ended up in storage.

Seeing ghosts

The ghost tablet, for example, had never been displayed to the public, and no one had translated its text. Nor had anyone noticed the hidden ghostly image on the reverse side of the clay tablet, either. That side appears blank until it’s viewed under a light at just the right angle, when the image of the ghost seems to leap out at the viewer.

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Original Source: arstechnica.com

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Searching for Solutions to a Crisis Decades in the Making

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Enlarge (credit: Makiko Tanigawa / Getty Images)

Island Press is “the nation’s leading publisher on environmental issues.” In its latest release, Thicker than Water, Erica Cirino, a photojournalist and licensed wildlife rehabilitator, explores what becomes of plastic—all 8 billion or so tons of it that humans have manufactured in the last seventy-ish years. 

Plastic’s greatest strength is also its greatest flaw: It takes eons to break down. It breaks apart, into smaller and smaller micro- and nano-sized particles. But unlike natural materials like wood and glass, plastic doesn’t break down into its constituent chemicals. Those micro- and nano-sized particles are still plastic. According to Alice Zhu, a graduate student studying plastics at the University of Toronto, this is because the carbon-carbon bonds that form the backbone of most plastic polymers require an immense amount of energy to break apart. And because these bonds are in synthetic arrangements, there are no microorganisms that can break most of them down (yet).

The big asymmetry

There is a marked disconnect between how long plastic sticks around and how long we get utility from it. Many single-use items, like straws and cutlery, are used for only minutes; thin plastic bags, like those needlessly wrapped around produce and almost everything we order online (and even plastic cutlery), are immediately thrown away. This thin plastic is made of low density polyethylene, which is the most difficult kind to recycle and emits more climate-warming methane and ethylene when exposed to sunlight than other, harder types of plastic. It is also one of the most commonly produced.

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Original Post: arstechnica.com

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